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Science

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Ecology, Birdsong, Animal Behavior, Sexual Behavior

Australian Birds Attract Mates with "Scary Movie Effect"

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Male splendid fairy-wrens, a sexually promiscuous small bird native to Australia, are known to sing a special song each time they hear the call of one of their predators, the butcherbirds. New research from the University of Chicago finds that this seemingly dangerous behavior actually serves as a call to potential mates – a flirtation using fear.

Science

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Crocodile, Ancient, Ancestor, Fossil, West Texas, Texas Tech University, Paleontology

Researchers Discover ‘Great-Grandmother’ of Crocodiles

The newly discovered crocodile ancestor came on the scene about the same time as dinosaurs began evolving.

Science

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Kansas State University, K-State, Beavers, River restoration, Ecosystems, Rivers, Streams, forest ecology

The Ecosystem Engineer: Research Looks at Beavers' Role in River Restoration

When engineers restore rivers, one Kansas State University professor hopes they'll keep a smaller engineer in mind: the North American beaver.

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Ever-Sharp Urchin Teeth May Yield Tools That Never Need Honing

To survive in a tumultuous environment, sea urchins literally eat through stone, using their teeth to carve out nooks where the spiny creatures hide from predators and protect themselves from the crashing surf on the rocky shores and tide pools where they live.

Science

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bird, Conservation, Extinction, Endanged Species

Without Intervention, Mariana Crow to Become Extinct in 75 Years

Researchers from the University of Washington say the Mariana crow, a forest crow living on Rota Island in the western Pacific Ocean, will go extinct in 75 years. The extinction could happen almost twice as soon as previously believed.

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Journal Of Mammalogy, kit fox, corn syrup, Mammals

Kit Foxes Are Adopting an Urban, American Diet—High in Corn Syrup

Increasingly, Americans are choosing packaged, processed foods over a healthier diet. And our foxes, raccoons, and opossums, too, are now consuming fast food of a different variety, finding leftovers from drive-thrus rather than chasing down mice, rats, and birds. The rapid spread of urbanization has humans and animal species living closer together and interacting more than ever before. This is evidenced by kit foxes in urban environments eating the same things as humans—particularly corn syrup.

Science

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Polar Bears, Extinction, Arctic, ice, Climate Change, Global Warming

Polar Bears Still on Thin Ice, but Cutting Greenhouse Gases Now Can Avert Extinction

New research indicates that if humans reduce greenhouse gas emissions significantly in the next decade or two, enough Arctic ice is likely to remain intact during late summer and early autumn for polar bears to survive.

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Caribou, Reindeer, Boreal Forest, Climate Change, Deforestation

Yuletide Warning: Rudolph Losing Ground to Climate Change

Jeff Wells, a conservation scientists and visiting fellow at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, is warning that reindeer, the beloved animals of Christmas lore, are in severe decline thanks to global warming and industrial development in their boreal forest homes.

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Entomology, Biophysics, Biomechanics & Biophysics

When Their Tools Get Dull, Leaf-Cutters Switch Jobs

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When their razor-sharp mandibles wear out, leaf-cutter ants change jobs, remaining productive while letting their more efficient sisters take over cutting, say researchers from two Oregon universities. Their study provides a glimpse of nature's way of providing for its displaced workers.

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Bizarre Crocodile Fossil Discovered Dispels Notion That These Reptiles are Static and Unchanging

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We all know that crocodiles are reptiles with long snouts, conical teeth, strong jaws and long tails. But according to researchers at Stony Brook University in New York, we don’t know what we thought we knew. Rather, some crocodiles possessed a dazzling array of adaptations that resulted in unique and sometimes bizarre anatomy, including blunt, pug-nosed snouts, pudgy bodies and short tails.







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