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Archaeology / Anthropology

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Science

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Preserved Fortification, Donkey Stables Dating to King Solomon Discovered at TAU's Timna Valley Excavations

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Intact defensive structure, livestock pens provide insight into complexity of Iron Age copper production

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Hydrology, Colonial America, History

Water Resources Played Important Role in Patterns of Human Settlement

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Once lost in the mists of time, the colonial hydrology of the northeastern United States has been reconstructed by a team of geoscientists, biological scientists and social scientists, including University of New Hampshire Ph.D. candidate Christopher Pastore.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Archaelology, Johns Hopkins University, Mut Temple, Luxor, Egypt

Website Follows Johns Hopkins Archaeologists in Egypt

Follow along online as Johns Hopkins University Egyptologist Betsy Bryan and her team of students, artists, conservators and photographers return to their investigation of Mut Temple this month, focusing their attention to the area south of the temple's Sacred Lake. Bryan and her crew are resuming their excavation in Luxor, Egypt, and are sharing their work via "Hopkins in Egypt Today," their popular digital diary offering a virtual window into day-to-day life on an archaeological dig.

Science

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Neandertal, Neanderthal, Washington University In St. Louis, modern humans, Neanderthals, Life Expectancy

Longevity Unlikely to Have Aided Early Modern Humans

Life expectancy was probably the same for early modern and late archaic humans and did not factor in the extinction of Neanderthals, suggests a new study by a Washington University in St. Louis anthropologist.

Science

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Neandertal, dental calculus, Paleobiology, Neandertals

Researchers Find Neandertals’ Extinction Not Caused By Deficient Diets

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Starch granules from plant food were discovered trapped in the dental calculus on 40-thousand-year-old Neandertal teeth, leading scientists to believe that Neandertals ate a wide variety of plants and included cooked grains as part of a more sophisticated, diverse diet similar to early modern humans.

Science

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DNA, fluid inclusions, Bacteria, Crystal, Organisms, Ecosystem, ancient material, Climate Change

Researchers Kick-Start Ancient DNA

Binghamton University researchers recently revived ancient bacteria trapped for thousands of years in water droplets embedded in salt crystals. For decades, geologists have looked at these water droplets — called fluid inclusions — and wondered whether microbes could be extracted from them. Fluid inclusions have been found inside salt crystals ranging in age from thousands to hundreds of millions years old.

Science

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Ancient Dna, DNA, History, Migration, Agriculture, University of Adelaide, Adelaide University, Europe, Stone Age, Neolithic

DNA Reveals Origins of First European Farmers

A team of international researchers led by ancient DNA experts from the University of Adelaide has resolved the longstanding issue of the origins of the people who introduced farming to Europe some 8000 years ago.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Archaeology, Apollo, Tel Dor, Excavation, Hellenic, greek mythology, Greek Art, RING, Bronze

Apollo Discovery Tells a New Story

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A rare bronze signet ring with the impression of the face of the Greek sun god, Apollo, has been discovered at Tel Dor, in northern Israel, by University of Haifa diggers.

Science

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Carbon-14, Archeology, Carbon Dating, Radiometric dating, GOLD

Research Shows Radiometric Dating Still Reliable (Again)

Recent puzzling observations of tiny variations in nuclear decay rates have led some to question the science behind carbon-14 dating and similar techniques. However NIST scientists along with researchers from Oak Ridge and several universities tested the hypothesis that solar radiation might affect the rate at which radioactive elements decay and found no detectable effect.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Archaeological Dig, Sussita, Hippos, greek goddess, greek mythology, Mythology, Tyche, maenad, basilica, Roman

Goddess of Fortune Found in Sussita

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A wall painting (fresco) of Tyche, the Greek goddess of fortune, was exposed during the 11th season of excavation at the Sussita site, on the east shore of the Sea of Galilee, which was conducted by researchers of the University of Haifa.







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