Feature Channels:

Nanotechnology

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Nanoparticles, Material Science, Biosensors, Biomedical, Nanoengineering, Biotechnology

Brightest Fluorescent Nanoparticles Synthesized

tem-nanoparticles.jpg

Clarkson University Physics Professor Igor Sokolov and his team have discovered a method of making the brightest ever synthesized fluorescent silica nanoparticles.

Science

Channels:

Nanoscale, Nanotechnology, nano, MIT, Caltech, IBM, UCSB, Nanoscience, Nanoscale Structures, Nanoscale Science

Scaling Up: The Future of Nanoscience

Four prominent scientists -- David Awschalom (UCSB), Angela Belcher (MIT), Donald Eigler (IBM Almaden Research Center) and Michael Roukes (Caltech) -- join in a dialogue about the future of nanoscience in the next fifty years.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Nanomedicine, Red Blood Cells, Synthetic cells, Cancer, Biomimicry, synthetic blood, Desimone, Unc Chapel Hill, Nanotechnology

Researchers Inch Closer to Unlocking Potential of Synthetic Blood

UNCarticle572183.image1.jpg

UNC researchers have created synthetic particles that closely mirror some of the key properties of red blood cells. The particles, which mimic the size, shape and flexibility of natural red blood cells, could potentially help pave the way for the development of synthetic blood and lead to more effective treatments for diseases such as cancer.

Science

Channels:

Graphene Grains Make Atom-Thick Patchwork ‘Quilts’ – as Scientists Find Their Electrical and Mechanical Properties

Artistry from science: Cornell University researchers have unveiled striking, atomic-resolution details of what graphene “quilts” look like at the boundaries between patches, and have uncovered key insights into graphene’s electrical and mechanical properties.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Nanoparticles, Cancer Therapy, Pancreatic Cancer, Grant, Ovarian Cancer

Einstein-Montefiore Researcher Will Test Nanoparticles Against Pancreatic Cancer

A $16-million grant from the National Cancer Institute will utilize specialized expertise developed by Steven Libutti, M.D., professor and vice chair of surgery at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore, the University Hospital and Academic Medical Center for Einstein. The research - carried out by a group of institutions, including Einstein, that comprise the Texas Center for Cancer Nanomedicine - could lead to novel ways to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer using nanoparticles.

Science

Channels:

Nano Engineering, Nanomaterials, Nanoparticles, Soil Contamination, Water Contamination

Nanomaterials in Our Environment

In a study funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a team of scientists from the University of Kentucky determined that earthworms could absorb copper nanoparticles present in soil. The manufacturing of nanomaterials has been steadily on the rise in the medical, industrial, and scientific fields.

Medicine

Channels:

Nanoparticle, Promoter, PEG-Prom, Cancer, Luciferase, Melanoma

Nanoscale Gene “Ignition Switch” May Help Spot and Treat Cancer

In a proof of principal study in mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins and the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) have shown that a set of genetic instructions encased in a nanoparticle can be used as an “ignition switch” to rev up gene activity that aids cancer detection and treatment.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Cells, Disease Detection, Drug Discovery, living cells, Nanoprobes

Nanotube Probe for Living Cells Can Advance Drug Discovery

A Drexel University team of engineers, scientists and biologists have developed a carbon nanotube-based device for probing single living cells without damaging them. This technique will allow experts to identify diseases in their early stage and advance drug discovery.

Science

Channels:

Applied Physics Letters, The American Institute of Physics , American Institute Of Physics (Aip), National Chiao Tung University, Iridium Memories, Nanocrystals

Iridium Memories

One of the rarest metals on Earth may be an excellent option for enabling future flash memory chips to continue increasing in speed and density, according to a group of researchers in Taiwan, who describe incorporating nanocrystals of iridium into critical components of flash memory in the journal Applied Physics Letters.

Science

Channels:

Journal of Applied Physics, EUV, Wafers, Semiconductor

Making Wafers Faster by Making Features Smaller

JAP-Dec14-coons.jpg

Manufacturing semiconductors for electronics involves etching small features onto wafers using lasers, a process that is limited by the wavelength of the light itself. The development of a new, intense 13.5-nm light source will resolve this issue by reducing the feature size by an order of magnitude or so, according to Purdue researchers writing in the Journal of Applied Physics.







Chat now!