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Science

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Cold and Bubbly: The Sensory Qualities that Best Quench Thirst

New research from the Monell Center finds that oral perceptions of coldness and carbonation help to reduce thirst. The findings could guide sensory approaches to increase fluid intake in populations at risk for dehydration, including the elderly, soldiers, and athletes.

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Researchers Discover Antimatter in Thunderstorms

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A research team at The University of Alabama in Huntsville announced that the GBM telescope has detected beams of antimatter produced above thunderstorms on Earth by energetic processes similar to those found in particle accelerators.

Science

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NASA Hubble Space Telescope, 2011 American Astronomical Society Meeting Seattle Washington

Hubble Zooms in on a Space Oddity

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A mysterious, glowing, green blob of gas is floating in space near a spiral galaxy. Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope uncovered delicate filaments of gas and a pocket of young star clusters in the giant object called Hanny's Voorwerp, which is the size of our Milky Way galaxy. These results will be presented at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society on Jan. 10, 2011.

Science

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Oganov, USPEX

Breakthrough in Crystal Structure Prediction Supports Theory on Neptune's Interior Heat

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Stony Brook University Professor of Geosciences and Physics, Artem Oganov, along with several colleagues, appears to have solved the long-standing mystery of excessive heat on the planet Neptune. Using Oganov’s innovative method for crystal structure prediction, the researchers have established support for theory that the sinking of massive amounts of diamond in Neptune’s interior creates its heat.

Science

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solar corona, spicules, Astrophysics, Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, National Center For Atmospheric Research, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, NASA, NSF, NCAR, Iris

Plasma Jets Are Prime Suspect in Solar Mystery

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One of the most enduring mysteries in solar physics is why the Sun’s outer atmosphere, or corona, is millions of degrees hotter than its surface. Now scientists believe they have discovered a major source of hot gas that replenishes the corona: narrow jets of plasma, known as spicules, shooting up from just above the Sun’s surface. The finding addresses a fundamental question in astrophysics: how energy moves from the Sun’s interior.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Space Policy, satelites, Near Earth Objects, Orbital Debris, space application

Secure World Foundation Focus on Orbital Debris, Near Earth Objects, Policy Issues at World Space Gathering

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Held in Prague, Czech Republic from September 27-October 1, the meeting’s theme was “Space for human benefit and exploration” with Secure World Foundation (SWF) taking a leading role in furthering the dialogue on a wide-range of space issues.

Science

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Lunar Silicate Materials, , Stony Brook University, NASA, Moon Rocks, Timothy Glotch

New Types Of Rock Found On Moon By Researchers At Stony Brook University And NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

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Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer, an instrument uniquely capable of identifying common lunar silicate minerals, scientists at Stony Brook University in New York and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have found previously unseen compositional differences in the crustal highlands of the Moon, and have confirmed the presence of anomalously silica-rich material in five distinct regions.

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Hubble Images Suggest Rogue Asteroid Smacked Jupiter

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NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshots revealed an impact scar on Jupiter fading from view over several months between July 2009 and November 2009. Based on comparison of Hubble images of Comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9’s assault on Jupiter in 1994, astronomers say the intruder in the 2009 event may have been a rogue asteroid about 1,600 feet (500 meters) wide. The 2009 images may show for the first time the immediate aftermath of an asteroid striking another planet.


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